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2019 DC Updates: Important Things for You to Know May 12, 2019

A lot has happened already in 2019. If you’re coming to DC this year, these are some important 2019 DC Updates that you need to know about.

Trip Hacks DC Tours

When we launched Trip Hacks DC we offered exclusively private tours. This meant that tours were just you and one tour guide showing you the sites on the National Mall. However, we heard that you wanted public group tours that were affordable to smaller groups. So last year, we created Monumental Trivia at Twilight.

This year, we added a few new tour guides. Monumental Trivia is a public tour which means that you pay per person rather than for the entire group. Rob will lead Monumental Trivia on Saturdays and our other guides on select other days of the week.

Washington Monument  

The National Park Service originally advertised Spring 2019 on their website for the re-opening of the Washington Monument. Unfortunately, now it looks like August 2019 is the earliest possible re-opening. Remember that this is only an estimate and can change.

Metro Construction

There is a major Metro shutdown scheduled this summer. The yellow and blue lines will be completely closed south of Reagan National Airport. This will last from Memorial Day weekend through September. This is especially important to know if you are considering staying in Old Town Alexandria for your trip. Even though Old Town is a great area and it’s one of our recommended areas it is not a good choice this summer. The good news is that there are still plenty of other great areas to stay. 

Smithsonian Folklife Festival

The Smithsonian Folklife Festival is one of our favorite things to do in DC. It usually runs for about two weeks and highlights cultures from all around the world. However, in 2019 it’s only going to run for two days: June 29th and June 30th. The official reason is because there are a number of delays and planning issues most likely as a result of the historically long government shutdown that happened last December and January.  

Circulator Bus

The Circulator bus is currently (and temporarily) free! In February, Washington DC Mayor Muriel Bowser announced that Circulator would be completely free indefinitely. Rides used to cost one dollar and you could pay either with a dollar bill or a SmarTrip card. Now, they are free, SmarTrip or cash required. Free Circulator won’t last forever. The DC City Council already voted to switch back to the old fares. So, be sure to double-check the Circulator website before you trip.

Another Circulator update is that they are launching a Zoo Express bus. It will take you from the Woodley Park station straight to the National Zoo entrance. This seasonal bus is going to run from May through September.

Spy Museum

If you visited DC in the past, then you might have checked out the International Spy Museum at their location downtown near the Capital One Arena. This winter, the Spy Museum started moving to their brand-new location in L’Enfant Plaza. It is bigger and will provide a much better experience for visitors. So, if you do want to go to the Spy Museum this year make sure to double check to make sure you’re heading to the right location.

Scooters

Electric scooters are seemingly everywhere in 2019! There are scooters from half a dozen different companies. You can download their app, create an account, and put in your credit card information and ride away on a scooter. These are also a fun novelty if you are on vacation.

One important thing to note is that the scooters are technically not allowed outside of their service area. The National Mall is outside of the service area.  So, when you are walking around the National Mall, you will see scooters everywhere. The scooter companies are not enforcing their service areas and charging people fines if they break their rules. But we do not know if this is still going to be the case in a week a month a year or ever. So, be aware of this if you’re planning on using them around the National Mall.

Jefferson Memorial

When you visit the Jefferson Memorial this year, you are going to find a big construction zone around the monument.  They are working on remediating a substance called biofilm. This black material is growing on top of the dome. From a distance, it looks like dirt but it’s actually a microscopic organism that attaches itself to the stone. This makes it a whole lot more difficult to clean up than dirt. The National Park Service did a successful test a few years ago which is why there’s one spot that looks nice and clean. Now they are going to do the rest.

Air and Space Museum

The Air and Space Museum is one of, if not the most popular, museums in DC. Smithsonian just started a major renovation that will last for the next several years. Be sure to reset your expectations of the museum since it will feel like a construction zone and the exhibits closed on a rolling basis.

Coming to Washington DC, want to come on a tour with us?

Trip Hacks DC was founded by Rob, a veteran tour guide in the Nation’s Capital. Trip Hacks DC provides tips,  tricks and travel hacks for planning your trip; and guided tours to show you around once you get here. Our tours are family and school group friendly and our guides specialize in the major Washington, DC sites.  Click here to check out the upcoming tour options and to book your tour here today!Feel free to contact us if you have any tour questions.

DC Day Trip Ideas: Five Nearby Destinations April 28, 2019

There is so much to see and do in DC. But what if you want to get out of the city and take a day trip? This could be a great option if you are staying more than just a few days. The best DC day trip one that’s close enough to travel there and back in one day, but far enough to feel like you’re really getting out of the city. Here are five of our favorites.

1. Old Town Alexandria

Is Alexandria really a day trip? It’s only about ten miles from DC. However, Alexandria is it’s own unique city that has its own history and charm. There are plenty of shops, restaurants and fun things to keep you busy.  

Just taking a stroll down King Street can be a fun experience. The Torpedo Factory Art Center on the waterfront is a destination on its own. When you come to Alexandria, you can sign up for a guided walking tour or a food tour and learn all about the area. If you’re thinking that taking the Metro won’t make it feel like a day trip then why not try the water taxi instead? You can use it to get from the Wharf in DC to Old Town Alexandria. There is something about taking a water taxi that makes the experience feel more unique and special.

2. Baltimore

Baltimore often gets overshadowed by DC, at least as far as tourism goes. But, people forget that Baltimore is a major city and it’s very easy to get to from DC. You can take the MARC commuter train from Union Station for this DC day trip. In about an hour and for less than $10 you can get to Baltimore.

Once you arrive, the National Aquarium is a huge aquarium right on the Inner Harbor.  DC does not have its own aquarium. So, if you’re into this sort of thing then this is a great excuse for a day trip. If you are a big US history buff, Baltimore has quite a few notable sites. One is the Star-Spangled Banner House. this is the actual home where Mary Young Pickersgill made the flag that now hangs in our American History Museum. It’s the flag that inspired Francis Scott Key to write that famous poem that is now our national anthem.

You can also see Fort McHenry – the spot where that actual flag actually flew. If you’re an art lover, the American Visionary Art Museum has a lot of funky cool art that you can’t really see in DC. And if you’re a sports fan, the Ravens and the Orioles both play downtown.

3. Gettysburg

When people hear Gettysburg they usually think straight to the Gettysburg Address – the famous speech that Abraham Lincoln delivered during the Civil War. Gettysburg is an ideal day trip for a Civil War history buff. It’s about 90 miles away in Pennsylvania and you can get there in about two hours. Gettysburg National Military Park is the main attraction. It’s where you can visit the Gettysburg National battlefield and the Gettysburg Museum. The park is part of the National Park System and it’s free to visit. Make sure to check out the NPS website in advance to see what special programming they have coming up.

4. Annapolis

Annapolis is the capital of Maryland. It’s located about 30 miles from DC. In good conditions you can make that drive in under an hour. But be very careful because that number could go way up if you attempt to do the drive during rush hour.  

Of course you can tour the Maryland State House, one of the oldest state capitals and often considered one of the most beautiful. You can also take a tour of the U.S. Naval Academy, especially if you’re into the U.S. Navy or naval history. Annapolis is located right on the Chesapeake Bay so if you go during a warm weather month you can rent a sailboat take it out on the water. Or you can go on a fishing charter and see what you can catch. Even if you don’t catch your own seafood, definitely eat Maryland’s signature dish: steamed Chesapeake Bay crab covered in Old Bay seasoning.

5. Charlottesville

Charlottesville is the farthest day trip from Washington, DC.  It is about a hundred and twenty miles and a two and a half to three hour drive. If you’re interested in the founding fathers or early U.S. history, this is where Thomas Jefferson lived. You can visit his home: historic Monticello.

Charlottesville is a small city and considered a college town because of the campus of the University of Virginia. But Charlottesville also has a lot of great restaurants without the hustle and bustle of a big city. Virginia has a thriving wine scene and a lot of vineyards are located around Charlottesville. So, if you’re a wine person, you don’t have to go all the way out to Napa Valley or France to go to vineyards. Of course, if you choose to do this make sure you’ve got a designated driver to take you around.

Coming to Washington, DC and want us to show you around?

Trip Hacks DC was founded by Rob, a veteran tour guide in the Nation’s Capital. Trip Hacks DC provides tips, tricks and travel hacks for planning your trip; and guided tours to show you around once you get here. Our tours are family and school group friendly and our guides specialize in the major Washington, DC sites. Click here to check out the upcoming tour options and to book your tour here today!Feel free to contact us if you have any tour questions.

DC in May: What to know before you visit April 21, 2019

Interested in visiting DC in May? May is in between busy spring break season and busy summer break season. It is also post cherry blossoms. There aren’t a lot of families in DC in May there are a ton of teenagers coming on their eighth grade field trips. May has springlike weather but if you’re hoping to catch some of the late flowering cherry blossoms, unfortunately you’re too late.

May weather

Weather-wise May is the most reliably spring-like month of the entire year.  The average daily high in May is a very pleasant 76 degrees and the average daily low is 54 degrees. To pack for your trip, we recommend you bring a lightweight jacket that you can easily throw into a backpack or a purse. Do not forget to bring your umbrella as well. May in DC is actually our rainiest month on average.

May holidays and special events

There are a lot of fun and special events that you can check out in May in DC. They don’t last all month so if you’re in town when one of them is happening, make sure to take advantage!

Around the World Embassy Tour

The first two Saturdays in May are usually when the embassies around the world have their annual open houses. This event is called Around the World. You can wander around the street that we call Embassy Row and learn about different countries and different cultures.

The embassy open house is split up into two weekends: one for countries from Europe and the other for countries from the rest of the world. The ‘rest of the world’ weekend is usually less crowded. A bonus trip hack is that there’s a cluster of embassies up near the Van Ness Metro station. They tend to be a lot less crowded than the ones that are down on Embassy Row (Massachusetts Ave NW).  

DC Bike Ride

Over 20 miles of DC streets are closed to cars during the DC Bike Ride. You can bike through Georgetown, around the monuments and on Pennsylvania Avenue. Whether you’re a novice or cycling pro, this is a fun and unique event. If you don’t have a bike you can travel with, don’t worry, there are plenty available in DC to rent.  

Memorial Day Weekend

Memorial Day is the only government holiday in May. The purpose of Memorial Day is to honor those who died serving in the U.S. Armed Forces.

For many years, Memorial Day weekend included the event called Rolling Thunder. Rolling Thunder is a meeting of veterans from around the country. They ride into DC on their Harley-Davidson motorcycles. However, this year is the last year for the Rolling Thunder. It also makes the experience on the National Mall a little bit different than on your typical weekend because of how many people are down there.

The Sunday before Memorial Day is when the National Memorial Day concert is broadcast live across the country and on PBS.  This takes place on the West Lawn of the US Capitol. A trip hack for this is to go to the full dress rehearsal on Saturday evening instead of the main event on Sunday evening.  It is the same show and the crowds will likely be smaller.

Other Non-Governmental Holidays

There are a few other non-governmental holidays in May worth noting.  May Day is on May 1st. Some people do use it as an opportunity for a rally a protest or another political event.  May the Fourth is Star Wars day. Don’t be surprised if you see someone walking around dressed up like Star Wars characters.  Cinco de Mayo is on May 5th so you may come across a party or two especially at one of our Mexican restaurants.

Mother’s Day is the second Sunday in May.  The most important thing you need to know about Mother’s Day is that it is probably the busiest brunch day of the entire year. So, if you’re in DC and you want to go to brunch on Mother’s Day, make a reservation well in advance.  

Coming to Washington DC and want us to show you around?

Trip Hacks DC was founded by Rob, a veteran tour guide in the Nation’s Capital. Trip Hacks DC provides tips, tricks and travel hacks for planning your trip; and guided tours to show you around once you get here. Our tours are family and school group friendly and our guides specialize in the major Washington, DC sites. Click here to check out the upcoming tour options and to book your tour here today!Feel free to contact us if you have any tour questions.

Metro from Airport: How to get to Downtown DC April 14, 2019

Reagan National Airport is one of the most convenient airports in the entire country. It is so close to the city that you can actually see famous Washington, DC landmarks like the Washington Monument and the Capitol dome from your seat on the plane. The airport’s location makes it easy and cheap to get into the city. If you are traveling to downtown Washington, a ride on Metro will get you there for under three dollars per person.

Step one: know your terminal

One of the most important things you need to know when you’re flying into this airport is which terminal your airline uses. Terminals B and C are very close to the Metro station and you can walk there from your plane in only a matter of minutes.  

Terminal A, on the other hand, is a bit of a hike. If you’re arriving through Terminal A, you can either walk down a long hallway to get back to the main part of the airport. Or you can ride on a free shuttle bus that will take you directly to the Metro station.  

What if you checked luggage?

If you checked luggage, then you are going to arrive into baggage claim. After you have your luggage, you need to find an escalator and go back up into National Hall. If you’re walking over from terminal A or you didn’t check any luggage then you can go straight into National Hall. This is the beautiful public space that you see in all of the famous photos. Once you are in National Hall, signs will point you down the hallway to the Metro area.

What to do once you get to the Metro station

Once you reach the Metro station, you will see the fare machines on the side of the station. If you’ve never ridden Metro before and you need to buy a SmarTrip card, you can do that at a machine. Look specifically for the orange and blue fare machines which dispense SmarTrip cards. Once you load your SmartTrip card with money, you can proceed through the fare gate.

The airport station uses a split platform

The airport Metro station is what’s called a split platform. This means that there are two separate sets of escalators. One set goes to the southbound trains; the other set goes to the northbound trains. If you go up the wrong one, you are going to be facing the wrong direction. Once you’re on the platform, you will see that you have a choice of two lines: yellow and blue. The one you should ride depends on where you are trying to go.

What line should you take to DC?

It depends exactly where you are staying. If your hotel is near the Foggy Bottom station then the blue line is the one that you want. If your hotel is near the Gallery Place station, then the yellow line is the one that you want. To get to a station that’s served by both, like L’Enfant Plaza, the yellow line is much faster than the blue line because yellow makes fewer stops in between. If you’re unsure, take a look at the Metro map or ask a Metro employee if you need extra help!

Coming to Washington, DC and want us to show you around?

Trip Hacks DC was founded by Rob, a veteran tour guide in the Nation’s Capital. Trip Hacks DC provides tips, tricks and travel hacks for planning your trip; and guided tours to show you around once you get here. Our tours are family and school group friendly and our guides specialize in the major Washington, DC sites. Click here to check out the upcoming tour options and to book your tour here today! Feel free to contact us if you have any tour questions.

Weather in Washington DC: What to Expect April 7, 2019

Every visitor wants to know: what to expect of the weather in Washington, DC. We have four seasons but only a few perfect days sprinkled about throughout the year. In the summer it is hot and humid. In the winter, it is cold and sometimes it even snows. Fall and spring tend to have the most pleasant weather in Washington, DC.

One way to quantify the weather in Washington, DC is using the “daily digit” which is published by the meteorologists in the Washington Post. Every day of the year they publish a score on a 0 to 10 scale rating how nice the weather in Washington, DC is that day. It is a somewhat subjective way of quantifying the weather but we think their scores are pretty accurate.

An analysis of the daily digit found an average score of 6.02. This means that on a completely typical day the weather in Washington, DC is neither great nor terrible. The months with the highest average daily digit are April, May, September and October . The months with the lowest digits are in December, January and July.

Summer

If you’re visiting DC during June, July and August, come prepared for heat and high humidity. The humidity is a really big deal, especially if you’re coming from a climate where you don’t have it. For example, a forecast might show a high of 85 degrees, which doesn’t seem so bad. However, when you get to DC the humidity might feel like the mid to high 90s. 

In the summer, sunscreen and water are a must. Bring a good water bottle with you, something that you can refill throughout the day. You also want to pack a small umbrella, even if your favorite weather app only predicts a small chance of rain. There is a always chance of evening thunderstorms in summer.

Winter

The thing about winters in DC is that yeah they are cold but they are not bitterly cold. That said, we do occasionally get a big extended cold snap. In 2018 it was so cold for so many days in a row that the Potomac and Anacostia rivers both froze over. So, if you come during the winter pack a coat hat and gloves and plan for some indoor activities. However, don’t think that outdoor activities are completely out of the question.  

Spring

Every spring, there are some beautiful days. But, it can also be unpredictable, especially the month of March. March can sometimes swing from beautiful and spring-like to cold and winter-like in a matter of hours. May tends to have the most consistently spring-like weather.

Cherry blossom bloom is heavily dependent on the weather. Colder weather in Washington, DC during February and early March means a later bloom. Warmer weather during those periods means an earlier bloom. The Washington, DC cherry blossoms are notoriously difficult to time.

Fall

If you can swing a fall trip, the weather in Washington, DC is still warm, but the humidity is starting to wind down. This makes fall a lot more pleasant than the summer months. One thing to keep in mind is that Washington DC is not a beach town but we’re only about a hundred miles from the Atlantic Ocean so a hurricane or a tropical storm near the coast is always a possibility here.

Coming to Washington, DC and want us to show you around?

Trip Hacks DC was founded by Rob, a veteran tour guide in the Nation’s Capital. Trip Hacks DC provides tips, tricks and travel hacks for planning your trip; and guided tours to show you around once you get here. Our tours are family and school group friendly and our guides specialize in the major Washington, DC sites. Click here to check out the upcoming tour options and to book your tour here today! Feel free to contact us if you have any tour questions.

Washington DC In April: Tips For Your Visit March 24, 2019

April is one of the busiest months of the entire year for tourism. Early April is usually when we get the perfect storm of cherry blossoms in bloom and school spring break. The weekend of peak cherry blossom bloom is always the busiest and most crowded weekend of the entire year on the National Mall and Tidal Basin. April is also right in the middle of 8th grade field trip season so be aware that when you’re visiting you’re going to share the sites with a lot of teenagers. Here is what else to expect when you visit in Washington DC in April.

Cherry blossoms

The National Cherry Blossom Festival is in full swing by April and there are several signature events and smaller events that are worth checking out. These include the parade, kite festival, and fireworks display. The most important thing you need to know about the cherry blossoms is that they are notoriously difficult to time. Do not try to plan your trip around seeing the peak bloom. Instead, just to come to enjoy spring and be pleasantly surprised if you do see the blossoms.  

Washington DC April weather

April is when we start to get pretty reliable spring weather. However, there is always a chance of a cold snap or a mini heatwave. The average daily high is 67 degrees and the average daily low is 44 degrees. It is actually a pretty tough month of the year for planning outdoor activities because temperature swings can happen throughout the day.  

The key to packing for April is to think in terms of layers. You would not want to bring your winter coat during April. But, you might want to bring some sweatshirts and light jackets that you can layer up depending on the temperature. The day before you leave for your DC trip, check the forecast for the next few days to see what the temperatures might be like; that way you can decide how many sweatshirts and jackets you might want to bring. You should probably plan to pack an umbrella, regardless of what the forecast says. Rain is not uncommon in Washington DC in April.

April holidays

There are no government holidays during April. There are a few unofficial ones to keep an eye on. April Fool’s Day is on April 1st – try not to get pranked! Tax day is on the 15th. Patriots Day is on the third Monday of April. Earth Day is on the 22nd. There are no official events for any of these holidays but people do occasionally use them for rallies, protests and other political events. So, when you’re down on the National Mall, you might find some people trying to get your attention about some issue or cause depending on the calendar.  

We could also potentially have religious holidays such as Passover, Good Friday and Easter. However, as a visitor, unless you’re specifically looking for a religious event, you’re probably not going to notice much happening for these holidays.

Coming to Washington DC and want us to show you around?

Trip Hacks DC was founded by Rob, a veteran tour guide in the Nation’s Capital. Trip Hacks DC provides tips,  tricks and travel hacks for planning your trip; and guided tours to show you around once you get here. Our tours are family and school group friendly and our guides specialize in the major Washington, DC sites.  Click here to check out the upcoming tour options and to book your tour here today!Feel free to contact us if you have any tour questions.

School Trips in DC: What Visitors Need to Know February 10, 2019

Participating in one of the multi-day school trips in DC is a right-of passage for many 8th graders across the U.S. If you are not visiting with one of these groups but coming to DC between mid-March and mid-June, these are a few things you need to know.

What is school field trip season?

School trips in DC are a huge part of the local tourism industry. Most schools send eighth grade class trips. This is why you will also occasionally hear referred to as “eighth grade field trip season”. Eighth grade is usually the class that gets to come to DC because it’s a final reward before the kids head off to high school.

Trip Hacks DC offers tours specifically designed for school groups. We have led tours with students in fifth grade all the way up to 12th grade. Our tours are best for small schools who don’t pay for an all-inclusive package. For large schools, these services might make more sense.

When is school field trip season?

School group trips in DC typically happen at one of two times during the year. The big one is in the spring, roughly from mid-March through mid-June. There is also a secondary field trip season in the fall roughly from early October through Thanksgiving.

If you’re trying to avoid field trip season the months you want to consider for your trip are: December, January, and February in the winter, and July, August, and September in the summer. Most schools choose to come in the spring because it’s an end-of-the-school-year reward. Plus, the students get to spend all school year learning about social studies and history and then they get to come to DC and see things up close.

Fall field trip season is much less busy since most schools don’t want to do the trip at the beginning of the school year.

How will field trip season impact your trip?

The most important thing to know is that school groups travel together in large packs. So, if you are visiting the memorials, there might be four groups of 50 students or more at once. This can really change the feel of some of the sites, particularly smaller memorials like the Vietnam and Korean War memorials.

School groups are only in DC for a limited amount of time. They need to maximize that time as best as possible. That means that during the day they’re going to be at the sites that are only open from 10 to 5. This includes the museums and the other indoor sites. Then, after dinner, they are going to head out and tour the monuments and memorials. This is because there are not a lot of evening activities you can do with big groups of teenagers.  

The bottom line is that if you’re visiting during spring field trip season you’re going to be sharing those monuments and sites with a lot of other people.

Where do field trip groups eat?

As far as restaurants go, school trips groups in DC tend to stick to a limited number of places. For lunch they go to food courts. The food courts at Union Station, L’Enfant Plaza, the Reagan Building, and Pentagon City Mall are all popular choices. Food courts are ideal for school groups because they’re cheap and they give the students a lot of different choices. For dinner, they go to the inexpensive restaurants that can accommodate groups. This includes places such as the Hard Rock Cafe, Buca di Beppo, Carmine’s, and similar chain places.

Where do school groups stay?

School groups usually stay at suburban hotels because they travel on charter buses. Thus they do not need to be near Metro. Suburban hotels usually offer group rates to schools. Although, you will occasionally see school groups staying downtown, especially if they’re a small group who doesn’t have a charter bus. So if you plan to stay at a downtown hotel and eat at mostly local restaurants, you are probably not going to bump into too many of these groups at those places.

Coming to DC and want to book a tour?

Trip Hacks DC was founded by Rob, a veteran tour guide in the Nation’s Capital. Trip Hacks DC provides tips, tricks and travel hacks for planning your trip; and guided tours to show you around once you get here. Our tours are family and school group friendly and our guides specialize in the major Washington, DC sites. Click here to check out the upcoming tour options and to book your tour here today! Feel free to contact us if you have any tour questions

White House Tickets: How to Get Tour Tickets October 14, 2018

The White House is one of the most iconic buildings in America. Getting White House tickets is relatively easy. In order to visit the White House, you need to request these tickets from your member of Congress. Make sure to do this at least three weeks in advance (ideally more like three months in advance).

Who to contact for White House tickets

American visitors have three people who they can contact to make their White House Tickets request. You can ask your member of Congress or either of your two Senators. Every Representative and Senator has their own website, but they don’t always look alike.

Where to find the form to request White House tickets

Once you are on your Representative and Senator’s website, look around under “constituent services” or “help” or “contact”. Sometimes the page you are looking for is called “tour DC” or “visit DC” or “tours and tickets.” Since there are well over 500 total Representatives and Senators it’s impossible to say what any individual site will look like.

Once you get to the requests page, some representatives will have a form right there that you can just go ahead and fill out. Some will make you register for an account first, and some, especially the more high-ranking members of Congress, like the Speaker of the House, will make you enter a 9 digit zip code. From there, you will fill out a standard contact form. It’s going to ask for your name, your contact information, and the three dates that you’d like to be considered for the tour.

Which days to pick

This is a trip hack you should consider: pick one, and only one, date on your contact form. Most people assume that if they pick three dates that’s going to increase the chances of getting White House tickets. The problem is that no matter how early you submit your request, you will not find out if you get to go until about two weeks before your trip. So, if you only choose one date you can plan out the rest of your trip and make a back-up plan on that one date if things don’t work out; whereas if you pick three dates it’s going to be a lot harder to plan your trip, because you have to hold all of those days not knowing if or when you’re going to go.

What happens if you get White House tickets

After you’ve submitted the form to your Representative, their staff will forward the information on to the White House. A White House staff member will follow up with you. They will send you another form where you will have to fill out your name, date of birth, social security number, and other information. Then you wait.

It’s important to remember that the White House is not a museum. A lot of people want to go. However, there is a limited capacity. So honestly, don’t be too surprised or upset if your request gets declined. The best way to improve your chance of success is to submit your initial request three months in advance and travel during the off season.

Good luck!

Coming to Washington DC and want us to give you a tour?

Trip Hacks DC was founded by Rob, a veteran tour guide in the Nation’s Capital. Trip Hacks DC provides tips, tricks and travel hacks for planning your trip; and guided tours to show you around once you get here. Our tours are family and school group friendly and our guides specialize in the major Washington, DC sites. Click here to check out the upcoming tour options and to book your tour here today! Feel free to contact us if you have any tour questions.

Cheap Eats in DC: Six Restaurants to Check Out September 30, 2018

Writing about food and restaurants is hard. This is a highly subjective topic. But who can resist great cheap eats in DC? We wanted to identify restaurants where you can get a meal for ten dollars or less per person. And for visitors, we wanted to find restaurants that are relatively easy to get to.

All of the prices referenced are recent as of 2018.

1. District Taco

District Taco started about 10 years ago as a single taco cart in nearby Arlington, Virginia. Today they have locations all over the DC area. You can get a set of three tacos, a burrito, or a burrito desnudo. They also serve nachos and quesadillas. On certain days of the week, fish and shrimp tacos are served. There is also a salsa bar, with salsas ranging from mild to very hot.

One bonus hack for District Taco is that while chips and guacamole usually cost extra, if you get a meal without any meat on it, they’ll give you the guacamole for free!

2. Good Stuff Eatery

Good Stuff is a burger restaurant owned by local celebrity chef Spike Mendelsohn,. You might recognize him if you’re into food competition shows on TV. The cool thing about Good Stuff Eatery is that you can get a sort of “celebrity chef experience” without paying the celebrity chef prices.

Our recommendation from the menu is the Colletti’s smokehouse burger. However, if you’re looking for something a little lighter, than Michelle melt, named after the former first lady, is a turkey burger that’s pretty tasty. The burgers are mostly under ten dollars, but it does get a little more expensive if you add fries and a drink. A useful lunch hack is that if you’re traveling with a family or a group, have everyone get their own burger and then share the fries and a shake. The shakes are delicious and filling.

3. Falafel Inc

A true cheap eat! Falafel sandwiches are only $3 and falafel bowls only $4. These are usually sufficient for lunch, but if you’re a big eater you can add a salad or some hummus for a few extra bucks. The six sauce options give you a chance to spice up your falafel to your exact taste. When you go, don’t be intimidated by the long line. The line moves quick because they have a limited menu and can move the orders really quickly. This is also a great option if you have vegetarians in your group because everything on the menu is vegetarian.

4. &pizza

&pizza makes every single pie fresh right in front of you. The pizzas are an interesting oval shape. However, they do not really fit into any kind of traditional style of pizza. Most of their suggested pizzas cost right around $10 but if none of those interests you, you can build your own as well. A typical pizza could probably serve two medium hungry people or someone who is really hungry could eat an entire pie themself.

5. Bub and Pop’s

Depending on what you order, this might break out ten dollar rule, but it’s worth it. Bub and Pop’s is exactly where you want to go if you’re looking for a true mom-and-pop experience. This husband-and-wife team (and their son) prides themselves on making as much of their food as possible in-house. It’s worth it to splurge and get the pickle and chips on the side. A bonus hack when you go is to try to avoid the lunch rush on weekdays between about 11:30am and 1:30pm. There are a lot of office buildings and hungry office workers nearby.

6. TaKorean

If you look closely at the name, you’ll see it is a combination of the words taco and Korean. Just like District Taco, TaKorean also started as a single food truck and now has several locations in the city. A bonus hack for TaKorean is that if you’re in town on a Tuesday, they do have Taco Tuesday discounts.

Coming to DC and want us to show you around?

Trip Hacks DC was founded by Rob, a veteran tour guide in the Nation’s Capital. Trip Hacks DC provides tips, tricks and travel hacks for planning your trip; and guided tours to show you around once you get here. Our tours are family and school group friendly and our guides specialize in the major Washington, DC sites. Click here to check out the upcoming tour options and to book your tour here today!Feel free to contact us if you have any tour questions.

Hidden Gems of Georgetown March 25, 2018

Georgetown is a popular destination for Washington, DC visitors. Between the picturesque row houses, the high-end shopping and the restaurants, there’s a lot to see and do. Don’t just stick to the main drag. Check out some of these off-the-beaten-path hidden gems of Georgetown.

Tudor Place

Tudor Place is the home of George and Martha Washington’s granddaughter, Martha Custis. This is the perfect place for any George Washington history buff to come and explore. When George and Martha passed away, they bequeathed their estate to their granddaughter. So, Custis used this money to build a home in 1805. The last descendant of Custis left the house in 1983. Now, the house is a museum where you can learn all about George Washington and see the gorgeous gardens. Above all, it is one of the less crowded attractions in Georgetown. It also has one of the biggest collections of George Washington memorabilia outside of Mount Vernon. Tudor Place is in North Georgetown off of 33rd street. Tickets are $10 each.

Old Aqueduct Bridge

Of all the hidden gems of Georgetown, this one might be the hardest to find because it doesn’t exist any more. This bridge was built to connect two canals on either side of the Potomac River. In the 1930s, the city demolished the bridge and by the 1960s they removed almost all of what remained. However, there is one piece still sticking out of the water if you know what to look for. There is also a huge swath of graffiti that is really cool to look at while you are out kayaking on the Potomac.

Exorcist Steps

These stairs are from the famous 1973 movie, The Exorcist. The film was based on a book by a student at Georgetown University: William Peter Blatty. The author actually witnessed a exorcism in the 1940s while attending Georgetown. In the movie, the priest falls to his death down these stairs after performing it.

Cady’s Alley

In the 1800s, Cady’s Alley was built as shops and stores. Over a hundred years later, in 2004, architects renovated the alley. So, they converted the buildings into trendy shops. Today, it is known as one of the most fashionable back streets in DC.

Pomander Walk

This quaint street is an extremely popular Instagram spot. It was originally the site of 10 homes built by freedmen. These modest homes were only 600 square feet and back then they were not connected to electricity or running water. Each home would house 2-4 families and the living was unfortunately not very comfortable. There was an act passed to resettle these communities and most were torn down. Eventually, the remaining homes were renovated.

Coming to Washington, DC and want us to show you around?

Trip Hacks DC was founded by Rob, a veteran tour guide in the Nation’s Capital. Trip Hacks DC provides tips, tricks and travel hacks for planning your trip; and guided tours to show you around once you get here. Our tours are family and school group friendly and our guides specialize in the major Washington, DC sites. Click here to check out the upcoming tour options and to book your tour here today! Feel free to contact us if you have any tour questions.

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